Examples include a welcome email sent as soon as a new client signs up to your list of contacts, followed a few days later by an informatory email discussing the products and services you offer, then an email informing on current offers, and so on. You could also create different series of post-purchase emails, based on the type of product the individual purchased.

Use personalization. Personalizing the content of your emails (depending on your segment from Chapter 3) will make it so much more relevant and valuable to them. Personalization goes beyond sticking your subscriber’s first name into the email. You need to tailor the actual content of the email to address their needs. For instance, an online retailer will find it much more valuable to read an email with the subject line, “How to build backlinks to your eCommerce store” than just a generic subject line, “How to build backlinks.”

I know that this is ancient, but I just made the switch to MailChimp due to a theme change (the theme uses shortcodes which WordPress eats for breakfast) I’d sent out one e-mail with MailChimp, and my second blog post got killed. I blog about re-selling crap I buy from garage sales, thrift stores, and flea markets on eBay. I actually have a blog post titled “work from home – not yet!” detailing why I’m not able to work from home. The hard part for me is that I don’t make enough money on the blog to justify using Awebr. If this is the way it’s going to go, I’m going to need to re-evaluate my blog, what I want to do with it, and whether I should make the switch to a much more expensive option. Not surprising that someone else has had a similar experience though.
People share their opinions about companies on Twitter each and every day. We monitor tweets about AWeber and apply a sentiment analysis algorithm that classifies these tweets as positive or negative. Every review is from a real person opinion. We use this information and output an approval rating score, which is based on real people, positive and negative, opinions about AWeber on Twitter

The funnel works from top to bottom. So, considering the first stage of awareness, here basically, the brand is trying to inform people about the product. The company is making the people aware about their presence and their brand. So when the first stage is cleared as people now are knowing who you are, the funnel gets a little narrow. This is when few users get cut down as according to them, they don’t need that particular product or service.
Title. Creating a title is the single most important thing you should focus on. Over time, you should get as creative as possible and test various types of email titles. It is the first thing a user sees, and it should be created to engage the reader and make them open the email. The more engaging your email subject is, the higher the open rates are going to be.
With that said, I’d like to offer up perhaps the most useful piece of advice that I think can really help you to create great content. It is simply this – be personable. You shouldn’t manufacture a personality (we can’t all be Johnny B. Truant or Ashley Ambirge), but don’t be afraid to let your true character shine through. Draw from personal experiences – use stories to bring your posts to life.
Using the Personalize dropdown, you can insert custom snippets like your subscribers first name, or sign up date, and AWeber will automatically insert that data specific to each subscriber if we have it. If you collect first name, for example, you can send an email that says Hello Tom, or Hello Mary, or Hello John, depending upon who you’re sending to.
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