Global Text Snippets can help cut down on this. It answers the “How did I get on this list?” question that pops into their head when they receive an “unfamiliar” email – even if it’s a list they subscribed to. So when you compose an email to send out to your subscribers about an offer that may be spread across several sites, you can say something like:
Hello, Vijay here from India. I been working as a Internet Marketing affiliate. I struggled a lot for getting sales for me. But, Once i saw this “Commission Gorilla” Bonus Page Builder, It changed my entire life. Now i am getting sales like a “PRO” EveryDay. Thanks to “PROMOTE LABS”. I always looking to use… “I Made My First Sale From JvZoo… Thanks To Commission Gorilla.”
Tip: We often suggest that you mention what you’re going to talk about in your subject line. However, Nathan Latka of Heyo once told us in a webinar that he usually goes for a really short subject line that provokes curiosity. (He claims he has even used knock-knock jokes.) In the right context, something like “Hey …” can be surprisingly effective. The casual and familiar tone coupled with the slight recognition of your email address may be enough to prompt an open.
Our 21st most-read story in 2018: America’s food safety system has a gaping hole: Growers aren’t required to test their irrigation water for pathogens such as E. coli. Congress ordered a fix in 2011. But Trump’s FDA shelved the rules. https://www.revealnews.org/article/5-people-died-from-eating-lettuce-but-trumps-fda-still-wont-make-farms-test-water-for-bacteria/?utm_source=Reveal&utm_medium=social_media&utm_campaign=twitter …

Not only do we promise a 60 day no questions asked guarantee but we even guarantee that you will not find a better deal that this anywhere else! Join today, watch the videos, learn and apply the techniques and if you can honestly say that you're not getting any results, then contact us for a full and prompt refund. We'll close your account for you, and you will have still walked away with more knowledge then when you first started. That way you never lose a cent, and we don't lose out as a business.

Alex GetResponse is a good service too. They have a smaller customer base than MailChimp or Aweber but they are definitely on the right track. You should consider your own options that will help you decide. For example, pricing, growth, support, reliability, deliverability, spam filters, etc. Make a list of these factors to compare on your own, you will also find such analysis around the web but those analysis could be biased towards one of the service. So you better do it on your own.
I am not a business selling anything yet but for MailChimp I have to give a business address that will be shown in the newsletters. I dont wanna give away my private address as well but how can I still legally (with the opt-in and everything) collect email address and be able to send newsletters? Would you still recommend MailChimp for strategic purposes or do you have any other ideas?

Thanks for bringing that subject up! Having you used both of these services in the past 2 years, I prefer Aweber over Mailchimp. For me it comes down to usability and efficiency, which Aweber just does better than Mailchimp. Having said that, I do like the value Mailchimp brings to the table for new startups with their free service. Also I do admit that giving away 2,000 subscribers to everyone – that’s just huge, yet clever at the same time.


We’ve changed email marketing from iContact to MailChimp and, just now, Aweber. We changed from iContact to MailChimp to cut costs. We then switched to Aweber because Mailchimp will not allow you to start an Autoresponder series on an imported list PLUS, as you mentioned, Aweber has much more robust measuring/management tools. However, people should be aware that Aweber requires imported subscribers to opt-in all over again.
Please note that my one star review is for Awebber itself, not this tutorial manual. I own my own personal internet domain. This allows me to create one-off email addresses, such as yourbusiness@mydomain.com In several instances where such one-off email addresses became jammed up by spam messages it turned out that the businesses to which I had submitted those one-off email addresses were Awebber customers. On one occasion both yourbusiness@mydomain.com AND yourbusiness.com@mydomain.com became clogged up by spam messages, while on another occasion both businessname@mydomain.com AND otherbusinessname@mydomain.com became clogged by spam messages. I thus have what I believe to be clear proof that somebody at Awebber is selling the email addresses from Awebber customers' email lists to spammers. My personal advice is thus to be extremely careful about using Awebber for any kind of email list management services.

Pop up form – Perhaps the most “in-your-face” option, these types of forms have a high likelihood of conversion. A pop up form appears over your web page and gives more attention to convey the value of your list. Many sign up form creation tools will allow you to customize the length of time at which a pop up form appears on your site (we recommend ~45 seconds, but testing is key).
The key is when visitors hit your blog it needs to look like something. This will lure visitors to want to sign up for your mailing list in exchange for something of value that you offer. This could be a special report, an ebook or some other free gift. Marketers call these “lead magnets” because you’re attracting leads that you can eventually convert as you sell them products and services.
Now don't tell Aweber, but I signed up to every one of the lists I created in my account. I signed up with disposable email accounts. I signed up with Yahoo mail.  I signed up with Gmail. I signed up with abut half a dozen different accounts. Guess what?  Every email hit the inbox. Every. single. one.  When you are building your list, you HAVE to KNOW that the emails are going to stand every chance of being seen and opened by your subscribers.  Why else would you send emails right?
I think this is just giving you a very cautious report. Infusionsoft is quite protective of their lists and how they send but it looks like you had 114,528 on your list and sent to 101,929 with 0 Skipped and 0 Errors. So the variance is due to several things such as the contacts didn’t have email addresses or there are some duplicates and/or 13,000 had opted out. You only had 12 Complaints, which is quite low, but maybe the bulk of them came during one segment that was sent, which created the warning. I have one of the senior support guys looking into this, but I think you are fine.”
Migration can actually be a major pain in the ass. Although according to aWeber my list was “substantially clean” but I still needed to get all my readers to reconfirm their subscriptions. After a week I’m still waiting for 70% of them to reconfirm. NOT happy. If I stuck to mailchimp I wouldn’t have had these problems. (Their support guys are good though.)
One of the best features of AWeber is the ability to create a series of emails that are automatically sent out to new subscribers.  This allows you to create an eCourse or some sort of introductory guide for your latest subscribers.  This is fantastic as you can market it as an incentive for people to subscribe (e.g. subscribe and get our free 7 day eCourse) and once setup, you can leave it to be sent out automatically.
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